Mission Road Animal Clinic

Senior Pet Care

An interesting fact that most people don't realize is that once their pet reaches 7 years old, they are considered senior animals. As they get older, it is more important than ever to remain consistent with their checkups.

Caring For Your Senior Pets

Senior pets can make some of the sweetest companions out there, which means they deserve the best care we can provide. Choosing to maintain their regular wellness appointments is one of the best choices you can make for them. Unfortunately, animal's bodies can change at the drop of a hat, causing potential issues to suddenly arise. The more consistent we remain with testing and checkups, the better chance we have of staying on top of their wellness journey and handling potential issues before they get the chance to advance. Often times, when we see our pet change through the years, we are tempted to chalk a lot of changes in behavior up to "normal aging". It is important to keep track of these changes as they may actually be signs and symptoms of a legitimate medical issue in need of treatment. We are here to help you make that distinction!

Bloodwork

Bloodwork is a key component to senior pet workups. The beauty of running blood tests is that they can often detect existing illness in an otherwise healthy seeming animal. Senior blood panels are typically used by veterinarians to check on metabolic and organ health. Being that we believe so strongly in the benefits of preventative medicine, senior bloodwork is of the upmost importance to our veterinary staff.

Urinalysis

Urinalysis usually goes hand in hand with bloodwork when it comes to wellness visits for older animals. After we run the urinalysis, we are able to get a clear picture of how the kidneys and urinary system are functioning. This is of extreme significance because senior dogs and cats run high chances of developing kidney and urinary tract issues or infections.

Diagnostic Imaging

Often times as our pet's begin to age, they start to "slow down" a bit. While it is expected for natural energy levels to decrease slightly as an animal gets older, there is a line between the natural process of things and potential arthritis. The beauty of diagnostic imaging with older animals is that we can often figure out if they are suffering from some kind of arthritic condition or have any type of internal growth that we were otherwise unaware of. Once we can confirm what we are seeing through imaging, we can formulate treatment immediately.